Blog

Coronavirus Mutations


When a virus replicates or makes copies of itself, it sometimes changes a little bit. These changes are called “mutations.” A virus with one or several new mutations is referred to as a “variant” of the original virus.

The more viruses circulate, the more they may change. These changes can occasionally result in a virus variant that is better adapted to its environment compared to the original virus. Some mutations can lead to changes in a virus’s characteristics, such as altered transmission (for example, it may spread more easily) or severity (for example, it may cause more severe disease).

Some viruses change quickly and others more slowly. SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes COVID-19, tends to change more slowly than others such as HIV or influenza viruses. This could in part be explained by the virus’s internal “proofreading mechanism” which can correct “mistakes” when it makes copies of itself.

Coronaviruses are named for the crown-like spikes on their surfaces. Scientists monitor changes in the virus, including changes to the spikes on the surface of the virus. Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating globally:

  • The United Kingdom (UK) identified a variant called B.1.1.7 with a large number of mutations. This variant spreads more easily and quickly than other variants. It has since been detected in many countries around the world. This variant was first detected in the US at the end of December 2020.
  • In South Africa, another variant called B.1.351 emerged independently of B.1.1.7. Originally detected in early October 2020, B.1.351 shares some mutations with B.1.1.7..
  • In Brazil, a variant called P.1 emerged that was first identified in travelers from Brazil, who were tested during routine screening at an airport in Japan, in early January. This variant contains a set of additional mutations that may affect its ability to be recognized by antibodies.

These variants seem to spread more easily and quickly than other variants, which may lead to more cases of COVID-19.

Leave a Reply